University Students Voter Registration

University Students Who Live On Campus

If your primary residence is the university on campus student housing you may register to vote in the precinct where your student housing is located.

University Students Who Travel To Campus

You should register to vote at your primary residence. Commuting to school does not change your primary residence.

Registering To Vote

Students registering to vote may do so online through the State Secretary’s website which is available from the linked Voter Guide.

State Board of Elections and County Clerk’s will be reporting unofficial numbers on election night. These numbers may differ from voting polls or each other.  We’ll report both sets of results through the Election Results page.

Pearl Harbor Stories of Survival

Not all heroes wear capes. On the day of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, so many brave crewmen showed immense courage in the face of grave danger and made their countrymen proud. From rescuing others to returning Japanese fire, these crewmen went above and beyond the call of duty that day and saved many lives.

Find out more about these Pearl Harbor heroes and discover their touching stories of bravery and selflessness.

By: Birte Petersen


In 1941, one of the greatest tragedies in American history happened at Pearl Harbor, in the Territory of Hawaii, when Japanese airplanes launched a surprise attack on the Navy base… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


More than 76 years have passed since the attack on Pearl Harbor and we are still finding new and inventive ways to recognize and honor the brave men who survived… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


Prior to the outbreak of war in the Pacific, Haleiwa Fighter Strip on Oahu’s North Shore seemed like more of an afterthought than an actual military installation. It served as… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


The attack on Pearl Harbor produced heroes of all kinds, and not all of them were fighting men. In a ceremony coinciding with the 76th anniversary of the attack, naval… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


Many heroes came out of the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor, men who risked their  lives for the sake of their fellow serviceman. Many jumped into the flaming, oil-slicked waters… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


What do you get a man who survived one of the most devastating events in United States history, a 97-year-old survivor who’s seen the world change time and time again,… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


For more than seven decades, the families of many of the 429 men who perished when the USS Oklahoma (BB-37) sank were unable to give their loved ones a proper… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


Not long after the United States was dragged into World War II, the role of America’s women changed drastically. Once limited to being schoolteachers, housewives, and secretaries, many women found… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


Over 2400 Americans lost their lives when the Japanese launched their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. But amid the tragedy, there were also tales of heroism, of men who swooped… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


The USS Arizona (BB-39) suffered a fate on December 7th, 1941 that would make her one of the most iconic battleships of all time. During the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor,… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


Many heroes rose to the occasion during the attack on Pearl Harbor, but some were recognized for their heroic efforts to protect their fellow servicemen. For their service, many received… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


On December 7th, 1941, the Japanese assaulted Pearl Harbor, killing over 2,400 American sailors, Marines, and civilians. On March 19th, 2017, Howard Linn, a former sailor aboard the USS Nevada… Read More

By: Mark Loproto


Before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Navy men like John S. Harper were simply doing their jobs. They woke up, got dressed, and engaged in their daily activities just… Read More

By: Steve Fagaly


The First U.S. Hero of World War II When the first Japanese bomber entered Hawaiian territory on December 7th, 1941, very few people probably stopped and thought about how they… Read More

30th District Judicial Candidates

Name Mailing Address Office District/Division Party Darryl Scott Lavery 3909 Springhill Road
Louisville, KY 40207 Circuit Judge 30th/2nd Nonpartisan A. “Annie” O’Connell 202 Crescent Court, Rear
Louisville, KY 40206 Circuit Judge 30th/2nd Nonpartisan Annette Karem 1804 Aberdeen Drive
Louisville, KY 40205 District Judge 30th/1st Nonpartisan Amber B. Wolf 317 Winton Ave.
Louisville, KY 40206 District Judge 30th/2nd Nonpartisan Tracy Davis 3701 Terrace Hills Drive, #203
Louisville, KY 40245 District Judge 30th/3rd Nonpartisan Kristina Garvey 3713 Hillsboro Rd.
Louisville, KY 40207 District Judge 30th/3rd Nonpartisan L. J. “Todd” Hollenbach IV. 317 Jarvis Lane
Louisville, KY 40207 District Judge 30th/4th Nonpartisan Julie Kaelin 1404 Debarr Street
Louisville, KY 40204 District Judge 30th/4th Nonpartisan Jennifer H. Leibson 7607 Old Orchard Ct.
Louisville, KY 40222 District Judge 30th/5th Nonpartisan

Sean R. Delahanty

1381 Tyler Park Drive
Louisville, KY 40204 District Judge 30th/6th Nonpartisan Lisa L. Langford 6601 Ken Carla Drive
Prospect, KY 40059 District Judge 30th/6th Nonpartisan Jennifer Bryant Wilcox 1104 Colonel Anderson Parkway
Louisville, KY 40222 District Judge 30th/7th Nonpartisan David Paul Bowles 3629 Kelly Way
Louisville, KY 40220 District Judge 30th/8th Nonpartisan Tanisha Ann Hickerson 4618 Wooded Oak Circle
Louisville, KY 40245 District Judge 30th/9th Nonpartisan Sara Michael Nicholson 302 Coralberry Road
Louisville, KY 40207 District Judge 30th/10th Nonpartisan Jessica Ann Moore 3044 Bardstown Rd.
#109
Louisville, KY 40205 District Judge 30th/11th Nonpartisan Eric Haner 2047 Sherwood Ave.
Louisville, KY 40205 District Judge 30th/12th Nonpartisan Anne Delahanty 2863 Regan Road
Louisville, KY 40206 District Judge 30th/13th Nonpartisan Stephanie Pearce Burke 212 Bellemeade Road
Louisville, KY 40222 District Judge 30th/14th Nonpartisan Anne Haynie P.O. Box 262
Prospect, KY 40059 District Judge 30th/15th Nonpartisan Katie King 3400 Dutchmans Lane
Louisville, KY 40205 District Judge 30th/16th Nonpartisan Erica Lee Williams 11106 Rock Bend Way
Louisville, KY 40241 District Judge 30th/17th Nonpartisan Lori Goodwin 1238 South Floyd Street
Louisville, KY 40203 Circuit Judge 30th/4th Family Nonpartisan Lauren Adams Ogden 700 Blankenbaker Lane
Louisville, KY 40207 Circuit Judge 30th/4th Family Nonpartisan Emily Maria Digenis 9462 Brownsboro Rd
Box 337
Louisville, KY 40241 Circuit Judge 30th/10th Family Nonpartisan Derwin L. Webb P.O. Box 7932

Louisville, KY 40257

Circuit Judge 30th/10th Family Nonpartisan

Sean Delahanty News

Candidates of the 2018 General Election

Louisville Candidates

COMMONWEALTH’S ATTORNEY
Democratic Party
Thomas B. “Tom” WINE

CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
Democratic Party
David Lawrence NICHOLSON

PROPERTY VALUATION ADMINISTRATOR
Republican Party
John T. MAY
Democratic Party
Colleen YOUNGER

COUNTY JUDGE/EXECUTIVE
Democratic Party
Queenie AVERETTE

COUNTY ATTORNEY
Democratic Party
Mike O’CONNELL

COUNTY CLERK
Republican Party
Barbara “Bobbie” HOLSCLAW
Democratic Party
Michael E. BOWMAN

SHERIFF
Republican Party
Robert Alan JONES JR.
Democratic Party
John E. AUBREY

COUNTY COMMISSIONER – ‘A’ DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Daniel B. GROSSBERG

METRO COUNCIL – 1st DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Jessica GREEN

METRO COUNCIL – 3rd DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Keisha DORSEY

METRO COUNCIL – 5th DISTRICT
Republican Party
John Mark OWEN
Democratic Party
Donna Lyvette PURVIS

METRO COUNCIL – 7th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Kent HALL
Democratic Party
Paula McCRANEY

METRO COUNCIL – 9th DISTRICT
Democratic Party
Bill HOLLANDER

METRO COUNCIL – 11th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Kevin J. KRAMER
Democratic Party
Derek Trent ASHCRAFT

METRO COUNCIL – 13th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Jennifer ALEXANDER
Democratic Party
Mark FOX

METRO COUNCIL – 15th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Richard O. BROWN
Democratic Party
Kevin TRIPLETT

METRO COUNCIL – 17th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Glen E. STUCKEL
Democratic Party
Markus WINKLER

METRO COUNCIL – 19th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Anthony B. PIAGENTINI
Democratic Party
William R. ACKERMAN III.

METRO COUNCIL – 21st DISTRICT
Republican Party
Bret A. SHULTZ
Democratic Party
Nicole GEORGE
Non-partisan
John A. WITT

METRO COUNCIL – 23rd DISTRICT
Republican Party
James PEDEN

METRO COUNCIL – 25th DISTRICT
Republican Party
Harold Temoth HENLEY JR.
Democratic Party
David YATES

CORONER
Democratic Party
Barbara WEAKLEY-JONES

SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION – BD OF SUPVRS – 3
Non-partisan
James Howard ROVENSKI
David W. KAELIN
Larry BUTLER
Jasmine WOODARD
Raymond L. ADAMS SR.

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE – DISTRICT 1
Republican Party
Shelly Renee CORMNEY
Democratic Party
Mera Kathryn CORLETT

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE – DISTRICT 2
Democratic Party
Gary FIELDS

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE – DISTRICT 3
Democratic Party
Angela D. HOLLINGSWORTH

CONSTABLE – DISTRICT 1
Republican Party
John D. ZEHNDER
Democratic Party
Bruce BOGGS JR.

CONSTABLE – DISTRICT 2
Republican Party
Virginia WOOLRIDGE
Democratic Party
Mike THOMPSON

CONSTABLE – DISTRICT 3
Democratic Party
Andre THOMAS

MAYOR
Republican Party
Angela LEET
Democratic Party
Greg FISCHER
Non-partisan
Billy RALLS
Douglas Edward LATTIMORE
Henry OWENS III.
Isaac Marion THACKER IV.
Jackie GREEN
Sean VANDEVANDER
Chris THIENEMAN

SCHOOL BOARD – DISTRICT 1
Non-partisan
Diane PORTER

SCHOOL BOARD – DISTRICT 3
Non-partisan
James CRAIG
Jenny BENNER
Judith L. BRADLEY
Derek Jermaine GUY

SCHOOL BOARD – DISTRICT 5
Non-partisan
Linda D. DUNCAN

SCHOOL BOARD – DISTRICT 6
Non-partisan
Waymen EDDINGS
Corrie SHULL
Nicole AGHAALIANDASTJERDI
Angela SMITH

ANCHORAGE SCHOOL BOARD – 1
Non-partisan
Colleen Kelly ABATE
Rosanna GABRIELE
Wendell W. HARRIS
Hannah BARNES

ANCHORAGE SCHOOL BOARD – 2 – Unexpired Term
Non-partisan
Robert T. WATSON

ANCHORAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
W. Thomas HEWITT

ANCHORAGE COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Neil RAMSEY
Brian RUBLEIN
Jason WALTERS
Cecelia HAGAN
William M. WETHERTON
Matthew DELEHANTY
Diane Valentine COOK
T. Hunter WILSON

AUDUBON PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Tony WILLIAMS

AUDUBON PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Andrew J. KLUMP
Daniel STEPHEN
Stephanie GEORGE
Seth Tyler KIRK
Jennifer W. KLEIER
Alex BREY
Ravi BHATIA
Madeline Mittel BOZEMAN
Brittney GORTER
Austin T. SCHWENKER

BANCROFT MAYOR
Non-partisan
Jeffrey S. MAGERS

BANCROFT COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Edwin L. EVERS
Michael BORDERS

BARBOURMEADE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Bryan COOMER

BARBOURMEADE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Robert T. LONGSHORE JR.
Thomas BUDNIAK
Dan Aron STREIT

BEECHWOOD VILLAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Timothy Logan GRIGGS
Timothy B. GEORGE JR.

BEECHWOOD VILLAGE COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Phyllis SKONICKI
Kelly CARLS
Lora COOMES
Mary Gwynne DOUGHERTY

BELLEMEADE MAYOR
Non-partisan
John W. MILLER

BELLEMEADE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Bob ELLIOTT
James N. MARTIN JR.
Andrew MILLER
Susan Dorten JARL
Jennifer GARDNER

BELLEWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mark KLEIN

BELLEWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Steve DOUGHERTY
Bruce S. GALE
Doug DeMOSS JR.
Austin KUPPER

BLUE RIDGE MANOR MAYOR
Non-partisan
Carla KREITMAN

BLUE RIDGE MANOR COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Debbie MILLS
Hans J. KLOSE
Porter S. LADY
F. Kenneth CONLIFFE

BRIARWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Michael McGRATH

BRIARWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Brian K. SUTTON
Laura LITKEA
Robert TOLER

BROECK POINTE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mark PETRUSKA

BROECK POINTE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Robin S. CECIL
Wendy PETRUSKA
Elizabeth KEENAN

BROWNSBORO VILLAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mark W. JOYCE

BROWNSBORO VILLAGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Dana Walker LINDLEY
Carol McCARTY
Fay DORVAL
Brian A. WILLIS

CAMBRIDGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Stuart KING
Gary OSBORNE
Gayle WILHELMI

COLDSTREAM MAYOR
Non-partisan
J. Kevin TAYLOR

COLDSTREAM COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
William STARKS
Glenn BUSBY
Paul CHAPMAN

CREEKSIDE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Zakirhushain “Zak” DUGLA

CREEKSIDE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Thomas WILSON
Paul VITELLO
Beverly A. WILLIAMS
Richard BEAN

CROSSGATE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Kirk HILBRECHT

CROSSGATE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Megan M. DOHN
Chas KRISH
Lawrence L. KIRSCHENBAUM
Jamie GERRISH

DOUGLASS HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Rick MORESCHI
Bonnie JUNG

DOUGLASS HILLS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Matthew NELSON
Denise SCARPELLINI
Neil G. SANDEFUR
Patti Walker EUBANKS
Jeffrey J. RIDDLE
Jason A. BOWMAN
William “Bill” MIDDLETON

DRUID HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ben FRANKLIN

DRUID HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
David WESTFALL
Ben ARNOLD
Bruce Charles BARBOUR
Alex GIPE

FOREST HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Kenneth W. GRIFFIN

FOREST HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Lydia MOEL
Sharon C. DOLL
Sharon HENRY
Chris WRIGHT
Gayle KNOOP

GLENVIEW MAYOR
Non-partisan
Walter T. HALBLEIB

GLENVIEW COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Donald BENNETT
John L. WARMACK JR.
Nanette TAFEL
Deborah M. REISS

GLENVIEW HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Bryan D. SCHMITT

GLENVIEW HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Justin F. WOODSON
Cordell LAWRENCE
Abigail GREEN
Lisa Aubrey BENTLEY

GLENVIEW MANOR MAYOR
Non-partisan
Joe MARTIN

GLENVIEW MANOR COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Michael RUSSELL
Kimberly PETERSON
Stephanie R. BELL
Jennifer T. RUE

GOOSE CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Jim WINDERS

GOOSE CREEK COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Tony SCHELER
David COMBS
Will OLLIGES
Stuart WOOSLEY

GRAYMOOR-DEVONDALE MAYOR
Non-partisan
John VAUGHAN

GRAYMOOR-DEVONDALE COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
David MEINERS
David BEAUDOIN
Mark A. SITES
Yvette WINNETTE
Alan BRYANT

GREEN SPRING MAYOR
Non-partisan
Trevor S. CRAVENS

GREEN SPRING COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Samuel Kemp MASON
Chris von ALLMEN
T. E. “Tom” PHILLIPS
Stuart W. RIES

HERITAGE CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Clifford “Larry” WEBB

HERITAGE CREEK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Joseph “Joe” SOEDER
Tammy Lee LLOYD
Benny WARFORD
Billy MITCHELL
John BENZ
Mary Jean WHITEHOUSE

HICKORY HILL MAYOR
Non-partisan
Richard E. DEARING JR.

HICKORY HILL COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Paul GESSNER
Jackie RICHARDSON
Martha HOSKINS
David “Todd” JONES

HILLS AND DALES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ralph George JOHANSON

HILLS AND DALES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Barbara P. ROGERS
Diane TOBIN
Roger A. OWEN

HOLLOW CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ken WOODBURN
Sonja D. MINCH

HOLLOW CREEK COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Greg BLUM
Lois KITTEL
Bruce SAYLOR
Nani SINGLETON

HOUSTON ACRES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Charles BARTMAN

HOUSTON ACRES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Mia Theresa SEITZ
Scott MEDLEY
Harvey HARDISON
Steven SCHLOTTER

HURSTBOURNE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mary Schneider MASICK
George STEWART

HURSTBOURNE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Lois WAGNER
Norbert HANCOCK
Earl HUBBUCH
Bennie “Ben” JACKSON
Bill LEAVELL

HURSTBOURNE ACRES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Terry McALLISTER
Sean P. FORE

HURSTBOURNE ACRES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Troy ESKRIDGE
Donna M. NICHOLS
Louis B. HAMILTON
Teresa C. RENNINGER
William Robert NOEL JR.
Brent O. HARDIN
Christine BOHNENKAMP

INDIAN HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Chip HANCOCK

INDIAN HILLS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Stephen L. GRUEBBEL
Kate B. LINDSAY
Gary ULMER
James A. GIESEL
Mary “Mimi” ZINNIEL
Sandra CARROLL
James Philip “Jim” GRIES
Frank P. DOHENY JR.
Jason Alexander KRON
Laura J. DUNBAR
Kay MATTON
LuAnn N. GEORGE
Lee K. GARLOVE

JEFFERSONTOWN MAYOR
Non-partisan
William “Bill” DIERUF

JEFFERSONTOWN COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Ron POWELL
Mark BLUM
Carol PIKE
Bill YOUNG
Christopher SMITH
Kevin RICH
Brian ABRAMS
Vincent GRISANTI
Pam WARE
Ray “Chubby Ray” PERKINS
Warren DONALDSON
Tim HALL

KINGSLEY MAYOR
Non-partisan
Rebecca BELD

KINGSLEY COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Cindy LANDRY
Beryl WARD
George BURNS
Lesa FERGUSON

LANGDON PLACE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mike FRANK

LANGDON PLACE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Charles R. O’BRYAN
Nicholas HOLMES
F. Scott SCINTA
Aaron HARDY

LINCOLNSHIRE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Lewis HUDSON

LINCOLNSHIRE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Emil PETER III.
Dean A. DUNCAN

LYNDON MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brent HAGAN

LYNDON COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Mardy SIDEBOTTOM
Carla S. NALLEY
Susan M. BARTO
Becky Baxter RICKETTS
Nathan SHANKS
Elizabeth KRAMER
Amy L. STUBER
Camille POPHAM
Trisha JEWELL
Kelly S. KRAMER

LYNNVIEW MAYOR
Non-partisan
Ann GLENN

LYNNVIEW COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Deborah OSBORN
Floyd “Randell” MATTHEWS
Suzanne STARK
Derek S. CARR
Linda PLAPPERT
Jesse D. PRUITT

MANOR CREEK MAYOR
Non-partisan
John YOUNG

MANOR CREEK COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Cynthia YORK
Clelland RUSSELL
Judy TIMMERING
Heather HISE
John RIESTER

MARYHILL ESTATES MAYOR
Non-partisan
F. Robert CAROTHERS III.

MARYHILL ESTATES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Adele Pinto RYAN
Andrew McDowell RENDA
Elizabeth Staley JANSON
Ashlie Courvisier MERCER

MEADOWBROOK FARM MAYOR
Non-partisan
Diane WOODS

MEADOWBROOK FARM COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Gary SANFORD
David M. WOODS
Kelly L. VANCE

MEADOW VALE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Mary R. HORNEK
Matt HAMMOND

MEADOW VALE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Cathy MORROW
Mike JONES
Mary “Diane” ROBERTS

MEADOWVIEW ESTATES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Connie K. WHARTON

MEADOWVIEW ESTATES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Dale VISH

MIDDLETOWN MAYOR
Non-partisan
J. Byron CHAPMAN
Todd ROLOW

MIDDLETOWN COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Tommie Lee ABBOTT
Ron WOLF
Mark STIGERS
Paul ZIMMERMAN
Amy E. OLIVER

MOCKINGBIRD VALLEY COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
David T. RICHARDSON
Richard A. LECHLEITER
Elizabeth W. DAVIS
Mark L. CORBETT
James Walker STITES III.

MOORLAND MAYOR
Non-partisan
David L. CHERVENAK JR.

MOORLAND COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Dwight E. GRAMMER
Morgan HERNDON

NORBOURNE ESTATES MAYOR
Non-partisan
Lucy HESKINS

NORBOURNE ESTATES COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Kevin M. THOMAS
Albert W. ERNY
Elena B. MARQUETTE
Jeffrey M. DAIBER

NORTHFIELD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Randolph CHAPPELL

NORTHFIELD COUNCIL
Non-partisan
James “Tracy” WALKER
Clark RHEA
Sharon BERGER
Brandon SMITH
Alan BIRCH
Steve LEVY

NORWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Keith MONSOUR

NORWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Chris SCHNEIDTMILLER
Brian D. DRISCOLL
Ashley REDENBAUGH

OLD BROWNSBORO PLACE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Angela BAZANT
Amanda WALUKAS

PARKWAY VILLAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
T. Paul AMSHOFF JR.

PARKWAY VILLAGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Mary Rose EVANS
Mara Beth CRAVENS
Tabitha HILLMAN-BURCHAM
Barry W. CRAVENS
Meredith RUBIN
Ken WHITE SR.

PLANTATION MAYOR
Non-partisan
Becky PEAK

PLANTATION COUNCIL
Non-partisan
Kurt WEIGLE
Roy G. WELLER
Susan SCHNEIDER
Kathryn B. RAY
Nita JAMES
Holly L. LAW
Jeanene CLARK

PROSPECT MAYOR
Non-partisan
John E. EVANS
Scott WHITEHOUSE

PROSPECT COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Harold SCHEWE
Sandra Cerow LEONARD
William W. TERRY
Gregory HUELSMAN
Rande Nortof SWANN
Frank FULCHER
Richard OVERY

RICHLAWN COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Andrew CARPENTER

RIVERWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
John M. DeWEESE

RIVERWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Sumner MacDONALD
Alex P. HERRINGTON JR.
Robert B. VICE
Lawrence BORAM

ROLLING FIELDS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Daniel Doherty TAFEL
Cyrus RADFORD
Robert JOHNSTON

ROLLING HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
J. Brent MONROE
David M. METZ
Michele BAGWELL-FAWVER

SAINT MATTHEWS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Richard J. TONINI

SAINT MATTHEWS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Robert C. ORR
Nicholas SCHADE
Bernard BOWLING JR.
Stuart MONOHAN
Cathi CLARK
Tim HOLLAND
Mary Jo Garvey NAY
Patrick WISSING
Amy OLSON
Fred WHITE
Shaun P. McKIERNAN
Tony G. WEITER
Frank A. FLYNN

SAINT REGIS PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brandt DAVIS

SAINT REGIS PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
John AMBACK
Louie SCHWEICKHARDT
Craig THEIS
Don ” D. J.” FOUNTAIN
Cheryl M. WILLETT
Jeffrey WEIS
Eric SHACKELFORD

SENECA GARDENS MAYOR
Non-partisan
David L. BROWN

SENECA GARDENS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
James M. MORRIS
Amie E. SCHULTEN
Andrea DIEBOLD
John E. MORRIS

SHIVELY MAYOR
Democratic Party
Beverly Chester BURTON

SHIVELY COUNCILMEMBER
Republican Party
Dennis STENGEL
Democratic Party
Lisa BEARD
Shanell R. THOMPSON
Tiffany M. BURTON
Chester L. BURRELL
Maria D. JOHNSON
Delbert R. VANCE

SPRING MILL MAYOR
Non-partisan
Karen NALLY

SPRING MILL COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Richard NALLY
Doris BADER

SPRING VALLEY MAYOR
Non-partisan
J. Patrick LONG

SPRING VALLEY COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
R. Scott McCORKLE
Michael J. MOYANO
Gregory J. WAKELING

STRATHMOOR MANOR MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brian COBB

STRATHMOOR MANOR COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Kathy ZANDONA
Robert L. PETERSON JR.
Brooke HEITZ
Susan STOPHER

STRATHMOOR VILLAGE MAYOR
Non-partisan
Jay BOWMAN

STRATHMOOR VILLAGE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
John BARROW
Mark E. KLEIN
Timothy G. SCHROERING

SYCAMORE MAYOR
Non-partisan
James BARR

SYCAMORE COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Virginia FORESMAN
Anne HESS
Amy P. WILLIAMS
Sally FANGMAN

TEN BROECK MAYOR
Non-partisan
David N. BRADLEY

TEN BROECK COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Theodore D. WILLIAMS
Michael HORBANIUK
Barbara J. HUTCHISON
Christopher KNOOP

THORNHILL MAYOR
Non-partisan
Julea LAWSON

THORNHILL COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Kelly PULLEN
William A. PIERCE JR.
Allyson STOUT
Kay WILLIS

WATTERSON PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Linda CHESSER

WATTERSON PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Phillip JOHNSON
Brett ASHLEY
Gina GARRETT
Tiffany WOODSON
Helen Jo ARNOLD
Marlene A. WELSH
Steven L. FORTWENGLER

WELLINGTON MAYOR
Non-partisan
Sandra MOON

WELLINGTON COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Carol PETRITES
Christopher SCHULZ
Sara Freibert SIEVERT
Milos MALDONADO
Neal COX

WEST BUECHEL MAYOR
Non-partisan
Brenda Kay MOORE
Joseph MATTINGLY
Toby CLARK
Rick RICHARDS
Robert “Randy” MULLINS

WEST BUECHEL COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Clara CRAWFORD
Evelyn SALDANA
John CAMPBELL
Loy CRAWFORD
Rhonda S. SANDERS
Billy HILL
Thomas FOX
Brandie WILSON
Ashley STEWART
Bonnie MANNING

WESTWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Nancy LAMBERT

WESTWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Nancy VINSEL
Robert S. OAKLEY
Robert PURDY
Richard WATKINS

WILDWOOD MAYOR
Non-partisan
Shannon BELL

WILDWOOD COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Patricia LaFOLLETTE
Nick HELLMICH
Robert DAY
Joseph A. KIPP
Phillip W. MYERS

WINDY HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Michael B. LUBEACH
Helen M. DAVIS

WINDY HILLS COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Norbert L. STEWART
Marianne RADEMAKER
Kate Kirwan GREER
Kimberly GREENROSE
James Allan MAINS
Laura TRACHTENBERG
Bruce E. BLUE
Marcia Clark MYERS
Suzanne SPENCER
Carl HORTON
Heather RUSSELL-SIMMONS

WOODLAND HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Michael J. F. OCHS

WOODLAND HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Ronnie G. COX JR.
Sally M. TILFORD
David W. TILFORD
Brad RICCA

WOODLAWN PARK MAYOR
Non-partisan
Larry LEWIS

WOODLAWN PARK COUNCILMEMBER
Non-partisan
Christopher Scott HORN
Gregory CLAYPOOL
Douglas WATSON
Shannon SEIDT
Thomas M. NUNN
Mike BROWN
George LANGFORD

WORTHINGTON HILLS MAYOR
Non-partisan
Bob STONUM

WORTHINGTON HILLS COMMISSIONER
Non-partisan
Carol CAMPBELL
Linda B. BEVILLE
Kenneth TICHENOR
Dennis R. METCALF

Sean Delahanty News

Ranking Louisville Candidate Site With Organic SEO

Its likely no secret we’re working hard to rank up Judge Sean Delahanty‘s site.  He had judgeseandelahanty.com but I’ve always believed that the primary site for any campaign needs to be someone’s name unless its hard to spell without any office referenced.

Thats why we developed his new election site seandelahanty.com.  Wanting to bring a small level of gamification and interactivity I added polls and debated a chat section but due to speed concerns on the domain I moved that idea to fordelahanty.com. Its a site to allow supporters to collaborate and make a difference.

In the image below you can see the vast majority of his tracked pages are on page one of Google.
In order to draw new traffic from higher search volumned topics I added the FAQ and Voter Guide content.  The voter guide is not the most innovative site but it is likely the one campaign site that provides maps and names on races beyond their own.  Its a gamble that the voter will find and appreciate Sean Delahanty’s site

The site recently received a make over notice the reported as of today.

ranking seo

Judging The District Court Judges – Insider Louisville

(Editor’s note: Several Insider Louisville contributors collected information for this post including Terry Boyd, who did the majority of the writing.)

This is a story with a back story.

We’ve been trying for weeks to get documents related to chronic absenteeism by a small minority of Jefferson District Court judges.

Insiders told Insider Louisville Chief Judge Angela McCormick Bisig is one of a group of female judges frequently absent from the court, a group that includes fellow judges Katie King and Michele Stengel.

Neither King nor Stengel replied to written requests for interviews left with court officials.

Bisig’s and others’ absences caused log jams, confusion and unreasonable workloads for the judges who do show up, say those sources, whose identities we agreed to keep confidential, because they have to appear before these judges, or work beside them as colleagues.

These particular judges are the judges who sort through the jammed criminal dockets in a court system that attorneys say is broken.

How broken?

For two weeks, we tried to find out, and we know now this is a story that will have to be teased out over time.

Judge Angela McCormick Bisig

Multiple sources told Insider Louisville that Bisig, among others, had extensive absences from her courtroom during 2012.

In an interview Thursday, Bisig told Insider Louisville that she hadn’t “taken a single day of vacation this year.”

However, the judge posted photos on her Facebook page of an April trip to New York City.

Bisig then confirmed she took “a long weekend” to go with her sons, adding that “any allegations of excessive absences are not true.”

What’s the truth?

We don’t know.

It’s nearly impossible to document the workings of the court, especially which of the 14 district court judges actually earn their paychecks, about $113,000 annually. (By comparison, Gov. Steve Beshear is paid $127,885 annually.)

Insider Louisville was denied documents, or told documents didn’t exist, only to find out they were public domain.

Beyond the stonewalling, documenting those absences and the additional strains they place on colleagues is difficult, because judges have virtually no obligation beyond personal scruples to show up.

We also came away with the feeling that at least one judge wants to tell the whole story, but can’t quite bring himself to do it.

District Judge Sean Delahanty doesn’t deny some Jefferson County District courtrooms aren’t in disarray.

But Delahanty won’t discuss the situation beyond vague assertions of lack of work ethic by other judges.

This very problem – backed up courts – was the driving force for a reorganization of Jefferson District Court last August.

Before that reorganization, judges were too frequently combining dockets, Delahanty said. That is, one judge doesn’t show up, so another judge has to fold that additional case load into his or her docket.

That’s still going on now, he said.

“The only reasons judges are supposed to combine dockets is vacations or emergencies, and dockets are getting combined way too often for other things,” Delahanty said.

He declined to go into detail.

In a story posted Wednesday on a survey of attorneys concerning the reorganization, Courier-Journal reporter Jason Riley quotes Delahanty as saying, “Some of these judges need to decide if this job interferes with their lifestyle, and I’m not going to say anymore than that.”

Which could be interpreted as a shot at Bisig, who appears frequently at social events featured in the Voice-Tribune newspaper, the Bible of Louisville’s social scene.

Pressed to address the major problems in the courts, Delahanty said, “There are things that will come out in time.”

“What he’s talking about is the lack of accountability the judges have in the way they spend their time,” said attorney Thomas Clay, a partner at Clay Frederick Adams, PLC.

Clay and other attorneys say there are two ways judges hand off their dockets  – by calling a colleague and asking that judge to take their cases, or to call into clerks of the court, who would assign the absent judge’s docket to another judge.

Which is what causes delays and confusion, with judges not in their assigned courtrooms when defendants, witnesses and judges show up for trials and hearings, say our sources.

The system leads to a core of judges picking up the slack including Delahanty, our sources said.

“I defy you to find one attorney anywhere out there who will say my courtroom is broken,” Delahanty said. “You can come to my courtroom anytime you want. Courtroom 204. You come any day, and you can see how a court should be run.”

Asked to talk about the workings of the court or attorneys who don’t run their courtrooms as they should be run, he demurred.

Most elected officials have some mechanism that can be used for accountability whether it be records of votes, legislation or roads paved.

But not judges.

Delahanty told Insider Louisville that he doesn’t believe there are any documents that have data documenting the time judges are in the courtroom or the volume of cases they hear: “We don’t keep a record of attendance.”

“It’s an issue that needs to be addressed. And this is not an issue that just cropped up recently. There have been questions about this topic for years,” Clay said.

Jacob Conway, whose Website Mentors consults with local judicial campaigns and frequent Insider Louisville contributor, said he finds ridiculous allegations that Bisig is a chronic no-show.

Bisig, a former prosecutor, “had a stellar record” in that job, Conway said. “She was one of the people who was always there, later than her job required, longer than any other judges … a workhorse. It’s why no one ever ran against her before.”

Conway says he believes allegations that Bisig and other female judges are devoting less than their all to their positions connect back to possible resentment about more women winning judicial elections.

“A majority of women on the court are women who beat incumbent men,” he said. “These men pointing fingers may be upset about the number of women judges (winning) just in the last few years.

“This is the last ‘old boys club’ left in (Kentucky) politics.”

––––––––––

Two weeks ago, legal insiders told us about a survey of attorneys coming out Tuesday, August 21 that would expose the Jefferson District Court system as a system in chaos.

We went to Bisig to request a copy. Bisig was non-committal, telling us she didn’t know anything about any survey, and wasn’t sure if it would be public record if there was such a document.

We persisted. We asked who paid for the survey, aguing if it was paid with taxpayers’ dollars, it’s a public document. Bisig said she didn’t know.

We asked state officials, including Leigh Anne Hiatt, public information officer for the Administrative Office of the Courts in Frankfort, for the document. Hiatt never followed up on our request.

We asked local employees at the Administrators of the Court, and they claimed the survey didn’t exist, or referred us to state officials.

Wednesday night, Riley posted a story on the survey, a story that stated 53 percent of 164 lawyers responding disagreed or strongly disagreed the reorganization had enhanced administration of justice, with 10 percent agreeing. (Thirty-seven percent had no opinion.)

 From Riley’s story:

Among the biggest problems cited in the survey are that the changes have led to too many combined dockets – those in which a judge took on their own cases as well as the cases of another judge who was either not in court that day or unavailable, backing up the process.

We tried to quantify attendance rates and workloads through the court dockets, which our sources told us judges must sign off on daily.

However, in an email response, Hiatt stated that’s not true (emphasis ours):

You … requested information about when individual judges are on the bench. The court system does not have any one document to provide that information. In addition, docket information does not provide a complete picture of when judges are working. When outside of the courtroom, judges may be preparing paperwork, reviewing probate files, ruling on default judgment motions and taking 24-hour calls regarding bond reviews, search warrants, emergency protective orders and mental inquest warrants. Judges can also have dockets on evenings and weekends. It is also important to note that judges determine their own schedules to meet the needs in their jurisdictions.

More as we solicit these documents.

2018 Complete Voters Guide – Available Now

2018 Complete Voters Guide

Judge Sean Delahanty‘s campaign site has collected tools and information from several sites and placed them in one place for your convenience.  We link or embed pages from the Jefferson County Clerk, the Kentucky Secretary of State, maps, data and news articles.

Whether you need to register to vote or you want to know the age ranges represented in a specific precinct we have that information here.  Its why we are calling it the 2018 Complete Voter Guide.

Register To Vote Online

The site directly links visitors to the state’s online registration form after providing eligibility requirements.  Alternatively we include the telephone number you can call to ask about registering to vote in person.

polling placeVerify Registration And Polling Location

We’ve embedded a database lookup that provides voters with their legislative districts as well as where they are assigned to vote.

Review All Offices And Candidates

We’ve included the list of offices from suburban city council to US representative.  We plan to expand our information on each of the Metro Council candidate’s and link to their websites as well as automatically display their announcements if available. This collection includes judicial races for Circuit Court, Family Court and District Court.

Sample Ballot

The County Clerk’s office will provide specific sample ballots in October, but for the time being we have a generalized sample ballot with city-wide and Metro Council races included on it.  This ballot doesn’t make judgements for you but lets you research the candidates on their own.

voteEndorsements

We encourage organizations that make endorsements to post their endorsements on their web sites or provide the campaign a complete list.  Endorsements will then be posted here regardless of if Judge Sean Delahanty was endorsed.

Frequently Asked Questions

Sean Delahanty knows elections can be confusing and laws or polling locations may change. We offer answers to an expansive FAQ selection and if your question is not already noted you can submit it to the campaign and we’ll try to answer it for you and possibly post it to the FAQs.

Election Polling

We will have poll questions on the guide pages where visitors can see the results of other visitors.  As polling is released by other groups to the public we’ll post that polling in the guide.

2018 Election Results

On election night there are several media and government outlets that will provide election results.  We’ll pull multiple sources together allowing voters to compare the numbers across outlets.


Voter Statistics And Demographics

If you’d like to know more about a precinct or district we’ve embedded a statistics tool into our site. This includes voter age and gender to the precinct level.

Voter Precinct And District Maps

house map

State House Of Representatives

With over 600 voting precincts in Jefferson County we thought voters may want to see a map.  In addition to precincts we have maps of Metro Council Districts and State Legislative Districts as well as neighborhoods.

The guide will not be “complete” until after the election, so check back often to see what new information has been added.

Sean Delahanty News

PROTECT ELECTION SECURITY IN TENNESSEE

 

Last month, Secretary of State Tre Hargett dismissed a national reportthat gave Tennessee a failing grade in election security, reasoning that the main threat to elections is misinformation keeping voters home, not foreign interference.

This could not be more false.

Thirteen Russians and three Russian companies have already been indicted for allegedly interfering in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, including operation of a Twitter account named “Tennessee GOP” that falsely claimed to be run by the state party, which attracted over 100,000 followers.

Former U.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, ex-Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff, conservative activist Grover Norquist and other experts have urged states to take election security more seriously in light of foreign attempts to influence the 2016 elections. Specifically, they encourage voting systems which leave a paper trail that can be audited.

Tennessee Congressman Jim Cooper has urged our state legislature to use the more than $29 million in leftover federal funding from the Help America Vote Act to help secure paper ballots.

This is not a partisan issue. We should all be concerned about the security of our elections.

With the vote as the foundation of our democracy, it is crucial that our election officials do everything in their power to defend our elections from malicious interference. Implementing voting machines that print receipts would help restore the integrity of our elections and promote election security.

TAKE ACTION: Tell Secretary of State Tre Hargett to protect democracy in Tennessee by implementing voting machines that provide paper receipts.

Louisville Sample Ballot For 2018 General Election

The following sample ballot includes judicial races, metro-wide races and US House of Representative.

Sample Ballot Only

The 2018 November Sample Ballot below includes all county wide offices including Metro Louisville Mayor. Districts smaller than the county level are not included on this ballot.  Check back for additional Metro Council district level sample ballots. This sample ballot is provided as a courtesy and is subject to change before the election. This is not an official ballot.

Sample Ballot Lookup

Additional Sample Ballot Resources

Voter Information   and   Election FAQs

Vote Louisville

Sean Delahanty News

2020 Marks 100 Yrs Of Women Voters

Women's Caucus Endorsed Sean Delahanty

Women's Suffrage Ribbon, Louisville

Women's Suffrage Ribbon, Louisville

Women’s Suffrage

19th Amendment turns 100

The following lyric is a revision of the song “My Old Kentucky Home”.  The lyric was composed by Madeline McDowell Breckinridge in celebration of Kentucky women gaining the right to vote in state and presidential elections.

Some Kentucky women had been able to vote in local school board elections and in local referendums on school taxes since 1830. The 19th Amendment in 1920 however revised the 15th Amendment emphasizing universal male suffrage.

The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home,
‘Tis winter, the ladies are gay,
The corn top’s gone, prohibition’s in the swing,
The colonel’s in eclipse and the women in the ring.
We’ll get all our rights with the help of Uncle Sam,
For the way that they come, we don’t give a ____.
Weep no more, my lady, Oh, weep no more today,
For we’ll vote one vote for the old Kentucky home,
The old Kentucky home, far away.

Remember to vote Tuesday, November 6.  Sean Delahanty has been endorsed by The Caucus, formally known as the Metropolitian Louisville Women’s Political Caucus.  Delahanty hopes that his record of 20 years on the bench serves as an example of his dedication towards equality.

To register to vote, verify your registration or to review detailed voter information visit this site’s FAQs and Voter Information pages.  We are also piecing together Judge Sean Delahanty’s Complete Voter Guide for 2018.  Check back for sample ballots in October.

Kentucky Women Suffrage

Kentucky Women Suffrage

Sean Delahanty News

Supporters Of Sean Delahanty New Site

The campaign is pleased to launch fordelahanty.com a site where Louisville voters can discuss the election and offer suggestions on topics for new videos by Judge Delahanty. The site also offers subscription news service for campaign updates and a link to a store where you can buy campaign gear to show your support.

SeanDelahanty.com remains the campaign site with news, video blog entries and voter informationJudge Delahanty has served as District Court Judge for Division Six since 1989 and was Chief Judge of District Court for four years.  He’s been endorsed by the Sheriff’s Deputies FOP, CFair, BSK of JCPS, Citizens for Better Judges, UAW CAP, IBEW, Louisville Women’s Political Caucus and many other organizations.  The election is only 69 days away on November 6,2018.  For voter eligibility and registration or polling location questions voters can visit Judge Sean Delahanty’s Election FAQs and the site’s Voter Information sections.

The state also has GoVoteKY.com.  The election is just around the corner now is the time to get involved and become informed about the candidates on your election ballot.

Spanish Who are you voting for shirt?

Spanish: Who are you voting for tshirt

Sean Delahanty News

Sean Delahanty New Logos And Apparel

Judge Sean Delahanty New Logos

 

jcta endorsement

Better Schools Kentucky (BSK) which represents JCTA the Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) collective bargaining organization that represents Louisville’s public school teachers and educators.

 

 

CFair endorsed Delahanty

CFair the political organization of the Louisville Fairness organization

 

which  promotes equality and human rights for LGBTQ Louisvillians endorsed Judge Sean Delahanty for District Court Judge Division 6.

 

Women's Delahanty Logo

Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus endorsed Judge Sean Delahanty for District Court Judge in Division 6.

 

 


New Sean Supporter Store

These new logos have been utilized on campaign apparel and accessories that are available at the campaign store located at https://www.seandelahanty.com/store.  The shirts, phone cases, golf balls, skateboards or even a Sean Delahanty pillow allow you to show your support around town to friends and family.  These items are not a fundraising source and are offered at the lowest price available through Zazzle.com.

To make a donation towards the campaign visit the official site at seandelahanty.com.  The site continues to grow and provide voter information, FAQS about the election and district court as well as campaign news and video by Judge Sean Delahanty.

We plan to expand the apparel options and additional logos for our other supporting groups.  The election is just 72 days away!

Sean Delahanty News

Registration Now Open for Tennessee’s Student Mock Election

The Secretary of State’s office is pleased to announce Tennessee’s 2018 Student Mock Election. The Student Mock Election was first introduced during the 2016 presidential election, which drew participation from 165,968 students and 479 schools across the state.

Students in preschool through high school from all public and private schools, as well as home school associations across the state, can cast a vote for Tennessee’s next governor and U.S. senator. Registration is open through Oct. 12, and results must be submitted by Mock Election Day, Oct. 30.

“Our goal with the Student Mock Election is to emphasize the importance of civic engagement in our schools, hopefully preparing our students to be engaged citizens as they reach adulthood,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett.

The Civic Education and Engagement Advisory Committee has prepared lesson plans for teachers to incorporate civic engagement into their curriculum leading up to the Student Mock Election.

For more information about the Student Mock Election and other civic engagement initiatives, visit sos.tn.gov/civics

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TennesseeDepartmentOfStateNewsFeed/~3/jWWx-M7zE5c/registration-now-open-tennessee%E2%80%99s-student-mock-election

New Customer Counter Now Open

The Secretary of State’s office is proud to offer a new space to better help customers visiting the William R. Snodgrass Tennessee Tower in downtown Nashville.

The Division of Business Services customer counter has moved from the sixth floor to the third floor lobby just steps from the 7th Ave. N entrance. Customers who need assistance from the Division of Charitable Solicitations, Fantasy Sports and Gaming can also get help in the new space.

Even with the popularity of improved online filing, some customers prefer to visit the division in person to file or request documents for business entities across Tennessee.

“We hope this move offers much easier access for our customers who interact with us face to face,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “This new space offers a one-stop-shop so members of the public don’t have to visit multiple floors or figure out how to navigate a government building to get things done.”

The new counter occupies the former home of the U.S. Postal Service which moved across the lobby.

The counter is available from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Central time Monday through Friday on the third floor of the Tennessee Tower located at 312 Rosa L. Parks Ave., Nashville, TN 37243.

Customers may contact either division below:

Division of Business Services

sos.tn.gov/business-services

(615) 741-2286

Division of Charitable Solicitations, Fantasy Sports and Gaming

sos.tn.gov/charitable

(615) 741-2555 or 1-800-861-7393

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TennesseeDepartmentOfStateNewsFeed/~3/EeTbvPFui3I/new-customer-counter-now-open

Video: Your Neighbors On Judge Sean Delahanty

Some of the most impactful endorsements are the ones we hear about from our family and friends. After 20 years on the bench in District Court in Division 6 Judge Delahanty has impacted the lives of thousands. We will continue to post these video endorsements and encourage you to let us know how you’ve met Judge Delahanty or why you are going to vote for him November 6, 2018.

More Of Your Neighbors On Judge Delahanty

[embedded content]

If you’d like to be featured in our next Your Neighbors On Sean Delahanty just record a quick introduction about who you are and why you are supporting Sean Delahanty. Personal stories that let viewers know how you may have interacted with Judge Delahanty are encouraged. You can record this video endorsement on your phone and email it to us at [email protected]

Your Neighbors On Judge Delahanty

[embedded content]

For updates on the campaign feel free to join the site or follow Judge Delahanty on your preferred social media platform.  You also don’t have to make a video to help.  Sean has accounts on nearly a dozen.  Post to your social media the link back to our site and let your friends know you support Judge Sean Delahanty just like people in these videos.  Visit Sean Delahanty’s Youtube Channel for more videos or search our site.

Sean Delahanty News

Courier-Journal – 2018 Dainty Contest

Supriya Sridhar, Louisville Courier JournalPublished 7:34 p.m. ET July 30, 2018 | Updated 10:03 a.m. ET Aug. 1, 2018

Correction: This story has been updated to reflect the correct spelling of Hauck’s Handy Store and the name of Lynn Hauck Hite. 

Salt and pepper hair and brightly colored lawn chairs lined the streets surrounding Hauck’s Handy Store on Monday evening, as those 45 years and older signed up to compete in the annual World Championship Dainty Contest.

Using a 3-foot broom handle, competitors try to pop up and hit the small wooden peg. They get three shots to try to hit it as far down George Hauck Way as they can.

The street game was created by German immigrants in the 1800s. It was brought to Schnitzelburg in 1971 by George Hauck, who created the game to bring the community closer together. And proceeds go to the Little Sisters of the Poor.

Old swing tunes spread around the streets. Standing under the Hauck’s Handy Store sign, Lynn Hauck Hite, George Hauck’s daughter, runs around gathering beer tickets selling icy drinks from the storefront.

“It always meant a lot to dad and all of us,” she said.

Hauck, 98, was unable to make the event this year. However, his daughter, Lynn, and other Dainty veterans are continuing the tradition.

Gary Allen wears a neon yellow T-shirt and clutches a microphone in his hand. The 66-year-old has been organizing the event for 13 years.

When he began, there were nearly 300 people in attendance. Today the event has grown to close to 500.

One of those attendees is Mike McDermott, 39. He sits in a lawn chair along the side of the road with his mother, Pat.

Watching participants prepare, he smiles.

“It’s not as easy as it looks,” McDermott said.

McDermott has been coming to the event for nearly 30 years now. It’s a tradition for him. He’s seen people who are freshly 45 and 80-year-olds participate in some friendly competition.

Sister Michele and Mary Schmidt laugh as excitement amongst watchers grows. Sister Michele lives in the area and has been coming to the event for five years.

“There’s nothing like this,” she said, lips spreading into a grin.

As drops of rain begin to splatter amongst the crowd, attendees pull out umbrellas and pull up hoods, unfazed by the weather.

Old friends, local dignitaries and young onlookers hug and laugh as one by one players strike out. They cheer as a sudden hit sends a peg flying through the air.

Gary Allen speaks into the mic, calling contestants up, one more excited than the next.

“Every year someone says I can’t wait to be 45,” he said.

Reach Supriya at 502-582-4078 or [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @Supriyasridhar_. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today: cjky.it/subscribe

Sean Delahanty News

JCTA, JCPS Teachers Union, Endorses Sean Delahanty for District Court Judge

Better Schools Kentucky, the political organization of the Jefferson County Teachers (JCTA) has endorsed your [Sean Delahanty’s] election campaign for Jefferson County District Court Judge, 30th District, Division 6.

Judge Sean Delahanty is humbled to have the endorsement of the largest educational political organization in Louisville, KY.
Better Schools Kentucky is a political action committee made up of Kentucky teachers. They seek to support pro-public education candidates who will promote what is best for children and public education throughout the Commonwealth.
The Better Schools Kentucky Committee evaluates incumbents’ voting records on public education issues, interviews candidates, and reviews candidates’ answers to written questionnaires. After considering all of this information, the Committee recommends candidates who are strong advocates for children, teachers and public education; candidates who will listen to the concerns of classroom teachers; and candidates who feel, as they do, that teachers and public schools are important.

The PDF endorsement letter is viewable at the bottom of this page.
Louisville’s Sean Delahanty understands that free public education for all students in Louisville, KY is essential to the growth and prosperity of the entire community.  While there are challenges in any community, Delahanty is proud of Louisville’s educational system.  Delahanty is a native Louisvillian.  Judge Delahanty believes his local education and his teachers were an impactful force leading to his career in law.  This community should lead the advocacy, education and curriculum of it’s schools.

BSK Represents JCTA

JCTA was first established in 1968. Over thirty-five years later they are the recognized bargaining agent for over 6,000 certified personnel employed by Jefferson County Public Schools. They represent teachers, librarians, speech clinicians, physical therapists and occupational therapists in every one of the public schools in Jefferson County.
JCTA’s mission is to serve as the active voice of their members; promote quality and equity in public schools; expand and protect the rights and interests of their members; and advocate human, civil and economic rights for all.
better-schools-endorsement-1-2

Sean Delahanty News

In ICE’s path: ‘When they first arrested me, I thought I was done’

Ramón (right) and his attorney, Marian Cochran | Photo by Joe Sonka

Sixteen years after swimming through human waste to enter the United States from Mexico, Ramón was living the American dream, having worked his way up in a local company over the past 12 years and earning enough to send $500 a month back to his family.
In early June, a chance encounter put that dream on hold, however. A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer was looking for his roommate in the parking lot of their apartment complex and instead found Ramón.
Although he had no criminal record, the ICE agent later told Ramón to turn himself in and pay a $5,000 bond, or else he would be arrested without any possibility of bond and deported back to Mexico. The officer also texted him a notice to appear in the Chicago Immigration Court, though the spaces for the date and time to do so were left blank.
Thinking that this sounded like a scam, Ramón — whose full name is being withheld because of potential legal complications — did not turn himself in.
The next week, the ICE officer came to his warehouse at work, put him in handcuffs and drove him to the ICE detention facility in Boone County.
Ramón would spend his birthday, the Fourth of July, in an overcrowded Boone County jail.
Upon hearing about his dim prospects from the officers in the jail and fellow immigrant detainees in his cell, Ramón had given up any hope of being free in America again.
“When they first arrested me, I thought I was done,” Ramón told Insider Louisville. “I was like, ‘Take me wherever you want to take me.’ I had no hope.”
After telling his cellmates that first night that he had no wife or children in Kentucky, “They said, ‘Oh, you’re going to get deported.’ I felt terrible. I say: ‘I want to stay, I don’t think it’s time to go back.’ ”
If Ramón was like thousands of other undocumented immigrants swept up by ICE who don’t have any legal representation, are unable to pay a bond or can’t speak English, he would likely still be in that same jail cell and counting down the days to deportation.
But he was not.
Days after being confined to his overcrowded cell — where he slept on the floor for the first two weeks — Ramón was told that he had a visitor.
This visitor turned out to be Marian Cochran, the managing counsel of CafePress — the company that Ramón began working for 15 years ago in California. He was among a select few promoted and transferred to Louisville 12 years ago to train its warehouse workers.
“He was shocked when he saw me at the detention center,” Cochran recalled. “His eyes welled up, my eyes welled up. We laughed that it was our first time in jail, both of us.”
Cochran told Ramón that she was personally taking his case pro bono, not on behalf of the company, and that she was going to try to get him out of jail — even though she knew almost nothing about immigration law and had actually never filed a motion in any court in her entire corporate legal career.
After his arrest, Cochran has visited the website of the Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR), which administers the 60 federal immigration courts, to locate the agency’s map of pro bono legal service providers who could come to Ramón’s aid, only to find that there are none in Kentucky and Indiana.
“That was one of the reasons that I decided to help Ramón because that’s just not right,” Cochran said. “I went on (the website) looking for resources to send him information about, and I was like, ‘I guess I’m his resource!’ ”
Five weeks later — after a crash course in immigration law and the filing of her first bond motion — a federal judge in Chicago granted Ramón a $2,000 bond, and he was picked up outside the jail by Cochran the day after it was posted.
“I just could not let this man that had worked for the same company I’ve worked for 15 years and was a model employee that everyone loved just be deported without a fight,” Cochran said.
Ramón’s fellow immigrant cellmates — almost all of whom had no lawyer — were shocked that he got a bond hearing so soon, let alone such a low amount, as several had been in that same cell for three or four months, and those who did get a bond had to pay as much as $12,000.
“Everyone said, ‘Get your attorney to help me!’ ” Ramón told Insider. “I said I can try, but she’s not an immigration attorney, she’s just helping me out.”
While Ramón is out on bond, his legal fight is far from over. He still faces removal proceedings and is without any legal status. Cochran will continue to represent him free of charge, optimistic that she can have his legal status adjusted so that he may remain in the country and gain a valid work authorization.
But Cochran and other attorneys in Louisville have a larger goal, as they witness so many other immigrants who, without a lawyer, have little chance of success in a legal system that is backlogged with deportation cases and ramping up prosecutions with unprecedented speed — including the creation of a new immigration court in Louisville in April that churns through over 150 cases a week.
With many immigration law firms at full capacity and unable to take on additional clients, the Louisville Bar Association is increasing its efforts to train attorneys, paralegals and law school students in the basics of immigration law, so they can help the many detainees and asylum-seekers in Kentucky who face little chance of avoiding deportation without legal counsel.
Cochran herself has decided to create a legal bond clinic to organize and train volunteers who want to help those immigrant detainees in the Boone County jail, and she wants to name it after Ramón.
With heartache comes action

In late June, the Louisville Bar Association’s human rights section and the Louisville Urban League hosted an “Immigration Law Boot Camp,” prompted by the news of children being separated from their parents seeking asylum at the Mexican border and detained because of a new “zero tolerance” policy of the Trump administration.
ICE detentions of immigrants with no previous criminal record have tripled under the administration of President Donald Trump, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions has attempted to make asylum claims more difficult for the thousands fleeing gang violence and domestic violence in Central America.
Just as many local attorneys had reached out wanting to know how to help immigrants after the Trump administration instituted a travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries in 2017, these family separations spurred another impromptu information and training session, letting those interested know what practical ways they could help.

Immigration attorney Ted Farrell | Photo via Russell Immigration Law Firm, PLLC

While not much can be done locally to help these child detainees in the headlines outside of traveling to the border and staying there for an extended period of time, local immigration attorney Ted Farrell told the audience that there were already plenty of immigrant families right here in the city and throughout Kentucky who were desperately in need of basic legal assistance to keep them together, and even those with little knowledge of immigration law could help.
Referencing the new Louisville Immigration Court, Farrell — who works at the Russell Immigration Law firm in Old Louisville — noted that up to 50 immigrants are facing removal proceedings in the city every day, “and only half of them are represented by attorneys.”
Farrell added that “many, many more people are arrested every day by ICE.”
“They are taken into custody, and because they don’t have an attorney to represent them in bond hearings, they are being deported — despite the fact that they might be married to a U.S. citizen, despite the fact that they might have U.S. citizen children that they’ve been supporting,” he added. “And what we can do as attorneys is we can represent these people.”
For attorneys with no experience in immigration law, Farrell explained that immigration attorneys can walk them through how to get qualified by the court, how to write a bond motion, or how to represent a juvenile immigrant in a special family court hearing.
He went on to cite examples of a UofL law student, a criminal defense attorney and a personal injury lawyer who all were able to successfully get their clients bonds, despite having no previous experience.
“(My firm) gets calls all the time, and we have to send people away because we just don’t have enough people power to represent folks,” said Farrell. “So the more that you can do, the better … You can do some real good in representing these folks.”
Studies point to the necessity of representation

Whether an immigrant seeking relief from deportation is currently detained or free until the conclusion of that case, studies and statistics on EOIC courts across the country show drastic differences in outcomes, depending on whether or not immigrants have an attorney, which court they are in and which judge is assigned their case.
A study in the University of Pennsylvania Review of immigrant detainees from 2006-2012 found that only 14 percent had attorneys, and those who did not have legal representation were overwhelmingly likely to have a negative outcome to their case.
Nearly half of detainees with attorneys were released from detention while their cases were pending compared to only 7 percent without attorneys. A third of detainees with representation applied for asylum or some type of relief from deportation and 21 percent won their case, but only 3 percent of those without an attorney managed to apply and only 2 percent won their case.
While not as drastic as detainees, an extensive database of EOIR removal cases compiled by Syracuse University found that attorney representation factors highly into the outcome of all immigrants seeking asylum. The database includes cases from 2012 to 2017.
Nationwide, only 20 percent of asylum-seekers are not represented by an attorney. While nearly 60 percent of asylum-seekers were denied by a judge in the last fiscal year, those without attorneys are denied 91 percent of the time, compared to roughly half of the time for those with attorneys. The denial rate by judges has steadily increased each year since reaching a low of 45 percent in 2012.

Graphic via TRAC Immigration database of Syracuse University Graphic via TRAC Immigration database of Syracuse University

The Syracuse database also shows that while 52.8 percent of asylum cases were denied from 2012 to 2017, the outcomes of these cases varied widely depending on what city the proceedings were in and what judge was presiding over the case.
For example, only 17.3 percent of asylum requests in the New York Immigration Court were denied compared to 93.4 percent of requests in Atlanta.
In Kentucky, there are two main types of courtroom settings for those in removal proceedings of the EOIR, depending on whether or not they are detained.
Those who are under ICE detention at their contracted facility in Boone County — like Ramón was for 36 days — go before one of the judges at the Chicago Immigration Court via video conference with their defense attorneys often connecting by phone. These judges preside over a detainee’s bond hearing and then the rest of that person’s removal proceedings unless a transfer to a closer court is requested.
Since its creation in April, non-detainees in Kentucky now go before the Louisville Immigration Court — located on the 11th floor of the Heyburn Building downtown — whereas before they all went through the immigration court in Memphis.
The creation of this new court in Louisville is part of an effort by the U.S. Department of Justice to speed up removal proceedings and end its huge backlogs of cases, which has multiplied by five times during the past two decades to nearly 750,000 with the typical wait time of a case now lasting nearly two years. While EOIR Assistance Chief Immigration Judge H. Kevin Mart has been assigned to this new court, it largely consists of rotating judges flown in from around the country.
These removal proceedings at the Louisville court include both juveniles and adults who are seeking various types of temporary or permanent relief from deportation. Most are seeking asylum, arguing that they are unable to return to their country of origin because of fear of future persecution on account of their race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group.
As of Friday, there were 5,185 pending removal cases in the new Louisville court, including 1,649 involving juveniles. The most common country of origin in these pending cases is Guatemala – followed by Mexico, Honduras and El Salvador.
Many of the juveniles and young mothers fleeing horrific gang violence sweeping Central America countries during the past three years have been granted relief by EOIR courts from their claims to belong to a particular social group — such as women fleeing abusive marriages or youth targeted for kidnapping and extortion by gangs.
However, Sessions made a ruling in June that directed judges to not consider the victims of domestic or gang violence as part of such a social group that could claim protection under asylum, arguing that this criterion had been broadened too far to protect the victims of private violence, instead of just government-sponsored violence.
The attorney general expressed concern over possible fraud, citing the nearly tenfold increase in asylum claims during the past decade as a basis for this ruling, but immigrant legal advocates have countered that this interpretation could serve as a potential “death sentence” for thousands of vulnerable women and children fleeing violence.
Children line up for Tuesday Immigration Court

One weekday morning in early July, a line made up of more children than adults had formed at the metal detector on the 11th floor of the Heyburn Building, stretching down the entire hallway of elevators outside.
Once screened and past the guards, many had to wait in the lobby outside the small EOIR courtroom, which had three rows of benches filled to capacity.

A line of families formed outside of the Louisville Immigration Court on the 11th floor of the Heyburn Building downtown | Photo by Joe Sonka

The judge would call a name, and an attorney would step forward to the table with his or her client, who put on headphones that would feed the audio of the interpreter sitting next to the judge.
The civil defendants would listen to their attorney explain why they were worthy of asylum or some other type of relief from deportation — such as threats of violence, extortion and kidnapping from criminal gangs — but would often hear accompanying skepticism from the judge, opining on why such a claim for asylum was legally doomed to failure.
Most of the children that morning were high school teenagers who ventured to American from Guatemala without their parents at some point in the last two years, though some were much younger — including an 8-year-old girl and 9-year-old boy whose attorneys pleaded for their haven in the United States.
This is the scene that plays out every Tuesday morning at the Louisville Immigration Court for its master calendar hearing of juvenile cases, where the judge for that day speeds through dozens of cases so the young defendants can enter their pleas and a date for their next hearing can be scheduled.
On this particular morning, the judge is Richard R. Ozmun from the Dallas Immigration Court, the latest EOIR judge randomly selected to rotate into Louisville.
Attorneys for most of the children indicated that they were seeking asylum on the basis that they belonged to a particular social group that has a credible fear of persecution and violence if deported back to their home country. Based on that same fear, some lawyers also sought “withholding of removal” — a less-permanent relief that still allows possible removal to a third country — or protections under the United Nations Convention Against Torture.
The judge was told by attorneys that gang members threatened to kidnap or murder the children unless they worked for the gangs or their family paid them off, which initiated the decision to send those kids north to seek asylum. The identified social groups varied, ranging from “young impoverished males opposed to gangs” to those of perceived affluent families being extorted, shaken down and threatened with violence.
Judge Ozmun in almost every case did not issue a ruling, instead, he simply scheduled the next hearing to go before another judge, but when hearing such claims, he repeatedly questioned if these could still be considered valid social groups that a judge should approve for asylum.
The Syracuse database of judicial outcomes highlights the luck of the draw when it comes to what court and judge an immigrant in removal proceedings is assigned to, and Ozmun’s statistics suggest he’s a tough one to get. Ozmun denied asylum in 83.5 percent of cases between 2012 and 2017. His rate has increased with each year; he denied asylum in more than 90 percent of cases in both 2015 and 2016 and then in more than 95 percent of cases in the 2017 fiscal year.
The master calendar hearing under Ozmun also showed the peril of not having an attorney, which was the case for a handful of immigrants by that July afternoon.
Ozmun stressed to a 17-year-old Guatemalan that it’s “very important to go get help.”
The 17-year-old who left his parents in Guatemala two years ago to seek asylum in the United States did not yet have a lawyer, and he was told by Ozmun that if he needed a pro bono attorney, he would have to seek one in Memphis, as no such services are provided in Louisville. The judge also told the 10th-grade student, who currently lives with his half-brother, could hire a local attorney.
That importance of having a lawyer was made apparent in the last case of the day, a 19-year old from Guatemala who had entered when he was 17 and was now working at a Mexican restaurant and sending money back to his parents.
When told that the young man did not get an attorney despite having well over a year to do so, Ozmun went ahead with questioning the defendant, who told the judge that he came to America because he was poor. Ozmun replied that he might be acting like a good son by doing so, but what he was doing is illegal and not a basis for asylum.
The judge said he could either accept voluntary departure — paying an immediate bond and agreeing to leave the country in 120 days — or he would issue an order for him to be removed, with no possibility of coming back into the country for 10 years. He took the offer.
‘It’s still really bad’

Alexandria Lubans-Otto, an immigration attorney based in northern Kentucky, told Insider that immigration judges are getting increasingly jaded when it comes to asylum cases from countries like Guatemala that are crippled by gangs.
“Judges hear the same thing over and over again, but it’s still really bad,” said Lubans-Otto, who was representing a client at the Louisville court that same day. “I think the judges would treat them as more legitimate asylum-seekers if they were there and saw it for themselves.”
Lubans-Otto said she has seen the same attitude among some judges when it comes to women with children seeking asylum because of domestic and gang violence, citing a case where a judge denied a client after she had described her rape to the court.
In the face of more barriers to asylum-seekers, she said attorneys have to be “more creative” with their arguments for those coming from countries with no jobs, no effective police and gangs demanding the service of male kids with the threat of murder as a system of “economic terrorism.” She added, “It’s not ‘gang recruitment,’ it’s slavery.”
In addition to this challenging environment, immigration law firms are increasingly overloaded with clients and have to turn many away, especially detainees who are seeking bond — as Ramón said happened to several of his cellmates who were unable to hire an attorney.
Insider observed one local immigration lawyer represent eight juvenile clients in a row in the rapid-fire master calendar hearing in the Louisville court.
Farrell of Russell Immigration Law told Insider that his firm currently represents 450 clients with open cases, despite the fact that they only have three attorneys.
“We get six calls a day from people asking for help, saying ICE got their relative and they are detained,” Farrell said. “We can’t take bond motions, we’re just too busy. There just aren’t enough attorneys to do that.”
He added that non-immigration attorneys volunteering pro bono work for such detained clients is a great help, but it still takes some valuable time for well-versed lawyers to walk them through what can be a complicated process.

Immigration attorney Duffy Trager | Photo via Russell Immigration Law Firm, PLLC

For example, the immigration attorney Duffy Trager, who works in the same law office as Farrell, showed Insider a 150-page motion that was only for the continuance of his client’s asylum case. He added that for immigrants without strong English skills, this shows “there’s almost no way that those without attorneys can win in these courts.”
“The speed that these cases are going through is unlike anything we’ve seen before, but there has to be a balance between efficiency and fairness,” Trager said. “We are there to slow down the process and get fairness for our clients.”
While there are no pro bono attorneys listed on the EOIR website, there are seven nonprofit organizations listed as resources that can connect immigrations with low-cost representation — including Kentucky Refugee Ministries and Catholic Charities in Louisville — but those, too, are at or near their capacity to help.
“We have good nonprofits, but they are overwhelmed right now, and the courts are speeding through these cases, and ICE keeps picking up more detainees, so it’s really hard to keep up,” Farrell said.
Sarah Mills, a senior immigration lawyer with Kentucky Refugee Ministries, told Insider that the organization has been able to increase the number of asylum cases it handles with the hiring of a third attorney, currently representing about 35 clients for a fee that is much lower than the market rate.

Kentucky Refugee Ministries

However, the nonprofit has to refer detainees to private attorneys and will have to turn down a lot of asylum cases unless they’re able to raise enough to hire more attorneys.
“We’re kind of reaching capacity,” Mills said. “We’ll still be able to take new cases for a while, but at a certain point, we probably won’t be able to take new asylum cases, we’ll have to stop for a period of time.”
While the moves by Attorney General Sessions are making asylum cases harder for those fleeing gang and domestic violence, Mills said that “creative” arguments by attorneys can still overcome those hurdles.
For example, Mills cited one asylum case they won in which their juvenile client was being abused by his grandfather, where they identified his particular social group as minor members of that person’s family. Kentucky Refugee Ministries also has been successful going to family court to declare Special Immigrant Juvenile status for clients, which grants relief from deportation for kids who have been abused or neglected.
Still, Sessions’ action will often mean “you’re going to have to appeal multiple times, and not all clients have the financial resources to keep appealing,” she said.
Mills said she hopes that other large firms in Louisville will follow the lead of Frost Brown Todd, which agreed to take three pro bono cases from Kentucky Refugee Ministries and devote a significant amount of resources to those clients.
Frost Brown Todd “got two or three attorneys and two paralegals on each case, whereas mine are just me,” Mills said. “So even though they are not immigration attorneys, they put a lot of resources into it. I think the clients got really great representation, and I hope other firms see this and help.”
Trump follows through on a campaign promise

The arrest and detention of individuals like Ramón, who’s had no criminal record during his 16 years in the United States, has significantly increased since President Trump’s first week in office.
Following through on a campaign promise, Trump signed an executive order that did away with former President Barack Obama’s policy instituted in 2014, in which federal immigration agents were to prioritize detaining undocumented immigrants who had committed serious crimes or were threats to national security.
While Obama’s first term brought a massive increase in total ICE detentions and deportations — along with a significant decrease in illegal border crossings — the percentage of those arrested by ICE with no criminal record dropped to 14 percent by 2015 and 2016.
That trend changed in 2017, when the total number of noncriminals arrested by ICE tripled to more than 43,000, while the percentage of detainees without a criminal record jumped to 33 percent.
Father Charles McCarthy, a Franciscan Catholic priest who leads Latino outreach for St. Peter the Apostle in southwest Louisville, has gotten to know Ramón in his three years with the church, where he has been an active congregant.
Despite what currently appears to be bleak odds, McCarthy said that the United States needs comprehensive immigration reform that no longer devotes the resources of its justice system to kicking out skilled people like Ramón, who has worked his way up through the same company for 15 years and been a model citizen.
“He is friends with all of the community that comes (to St. Peter),” McCarthy said. “He comes to mass. He roasted chicken at our parish picnic two days in a row out in the sun. He’s just a really good guy, a go-to guy. People are very happy to know him.”
McCarthy added that Ramón’s arrest was the second ICE-related incident his largely Latino congregation has had to deal with this year. In March, a mother of two was stopped in Jeffersonville because her taillight was out, then arrested by the local police and turned over to ICE.
“She’s got two kids, has her own business,” McCarthy said. “She’s very active in the community, she has a Zumba class, and she’s active in the church. One of her kids is diabetic, they are both U.S. citizens, and she’s been applying through her mother for legal residency for many years … These things are happening constantly.”
In July, “Occupy ICE” protesters gathered for weeks in an encampment outside the Louisville headquarters of ICE in opposition to the Trump administration’s family separation policy and ICE detainment tactics, culminating in the arrest of nine protesters who blocked the elevators of the Heyburn Building that provide access to the Louisville Immigration Court.
Sen. Mitch McConnell has taken the opposite position toward the federal agency, stating on the Senate floor that he will “continue to proudly stand with ICE, stand with the rule of law and stand with all the American families who would rather have fewer drugs and less crime in the communities where they’re raising their children.”
After hearing Ramón’s account of cellmates stuck in jail for months without any hope of even hiring an attorney to help them request a bond hearing, Cochran has hatched a plan to start her own bond clinic, hoping to attract more volunteer pro bono attorneys like herself. She says one colleague has already volunteered her services, despite voting for Trump.
“I think we can handle several cases a week and still just do it in our spare time,” Cochran said. “And the only costs associated with it is the $25 to run the criminal background check. We’re going to do this, and I want to name it after Ramón … We don’t need money, we just need volunteers.”
Ramón’s path to an American dream, then a nightmare
Unlike many of the young asylum-seekers coming from Central America in recent years, Ramón was driven north by his family’s extreme poverty — crowded in a house with no water or electricity — and the possibility of changing his fate.
“I stopped school and started working in the second grade when I was 7 years old … I was a shepherd until I was 15,” said Ramón, who taught himself to speak serviceable English. “I have 12 brothers, and I had to help bring income to support the kids … I was the fourth. My mom tried to send me to school, but with the tuition, it was really hard for her to afford food.”
Ramón heard about a friend who had come to California and found a job that paid him enough to send money back to his family and decided to take that journey himself in 2002 when he was 21 years old. In addition to supporting his family back home with roughly $500 a month since that time, he was able to pay for his brothers’ schooling, which he had been unable to pursue himself.
Cochran said that the government’s position is that he first obtained work by using fraudulent documents, which Ramón does not dispute, but she added that he has paid his full state and federal taxes every year that he has been in the country, which is often an issue for long-term undocumented immigrants who now find themselves in removal proceedings.
Ramón had started looking into acquiring a GED, but now, he has lost his CafePress job, which he said he was always afraid of losing “because it was a secure job with benefits, vacation time, holidays. The health insurance was really good.”
He is now alternating between staying with Cochran and her husband and other friends, uncomfortable about imposing too much on either. Grateful for all that she’s done, Ramón calls her “my angel.”
“You’re family now,” countered Cochran. “You’re going to be part of our Thanksgiving every year that you want. We have a small family, and we’re always happy to add good people like you.”
“He’s made me feel useful again when it comes to practicing law, and I’m doing something I’ve never done before. But I’m absolutely thrilled to be able to help someone in a tangible way,” she said. “He’s worried about taking too much, and I don’t think he realizes how much he’s given.”
Although there is always the chance that Ramón will not get the outcome he wants before the court in Chicago, Cochran said she is confident about his ability to gain legal standing and work authorization based on the advice and assistance she’s received from other immigration attorneys like Ferrell, hoping to speed up a process that can often drag on for years.
“I want Ramón to be able to fully participate in our society,” Cochran said. “I want him to be able to enjoy all the benefits of living in our society. So I really want to see him get everything he can possibly get, in terms of being able to stay here and have permanent status and hopefully citizenship. He certainly deserves to be here.”
When asked if he considers himself an American after all of these years, Ramón answered that he does.
“I’ve been living the American dream,” Ramón said. “I was living comfortable, keeping my job, learning a lot about American culture. I don’t get in trouble, tried to do my best, tried to be a good citizen. Yeah.”
Cochran said she views it as her moral and patriotic duty to keep that dream alive.
“I just can’t let my government run roughshod over these people who matter so much to so many of us and not step in and try to do something,” Cochran said. “I can protest, I can fuss, I can complain, I can cry, but if I don’t do something, I’m failing. And if they’re coming for him, they’re coming for me, too.”

Sean Delahanty News

KY Justice Secretary Says Out Of Room By 2019

By Avery Seeger | Kentucky New Era

Kentucky Justice Secretary John Tilley told the Joint Committee on Judiciary recently that the number of inmates in prisons and jails in Kentucky is at record levels, having a population over 25,000. After some investments, he added, the population is predicted to rise and reach over 30,000 inmates.
Kentucky is ninth in the nation for incarceration rates per capita, and second in the nation for female incarcerations, Tilley said.
“Our estimate is that we are out of space — officially out of space. I’m talking about no more use of floors, no double bunking, no more using rec space to house prisoners and inmates. We will be out of space in 2019; that was the number, May of 2019. Now, we think that’s going to be much, much sooner,” Tilley said.
Rehabilitation and therapy for inmates is a key concern. Tilley noted that out of the 71 jails in the state, only 21 to 24 offer some kind of rehabilitation or treatment, which he said is a challenge to help keep people out of jail and reform inmates.
A spike in drug felonies and property crimes are the drivers for the increase.
“I think it’s a huge influx of class D felonies. That’s possession (of drugs like methamphetamine, cocaine, etc.), theft; property crimes, those are the two main drivers,” Tilley said.
“There’s this idea that we don’t incarcerate people that only have possession charges but that is simply not the case. (My data) would suggest that not only do we incarcerate folks who only have possession charges but we incarcerate folks who may have other charges,” he added.
“But their single biggest charge is that possession charge, which is driving everything else and drives issues like property crimes and crimes to pay for their substance abuse, and it’s a cycle we have got to stop,” Tilley said.
However, the state has seen an overall decline in violent crimes.
“Really, other crimes in Kentucky — in certain areas of the state, there’s a little bit of an uptick; for certain ZIP codes, there’s an uptick in violent crimes but overall we’re still in historic lows in terms of violent crimes in the state and in the country.”
Another issue Tilley hit on and discussed with the committee is a large deficiency of correctional officers in Kentucky’s justice system. Tilley said there are about 160 correctional officer vacancies in Oldham County’s Kentucky State Reformatory.
He noted that the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet is looking into changing the requirements for correctional officers to hire more of them.
Currently, a four-year degree in corrections is required to be a correctional officer. However, Tilley explained that they are looking into changing the requirements to include individuals with military or law enforcement experience that have the skills to be correctional officers.
Tilley concluded his testimony with a relatively positive message detailing the statistics of Kentucky’s overdose death rates.
He explained that Kentucky had an increase of 11 percent in overdose deaths last year. However, that number, according to Tilley, is less than most other states, detailing that Indiana had a 34 or 38 percent increase and other states had more.

Sean Delahanty News

Everything Voters Need to Know for the Aug. 2 Primary

Tennesseans will head to the polls across the state Thursday to vote in the Aug. 2 primary.

626,894 Tennesseans voted in person or absentee during the two-week early voting period which ended Saturday, July 28, 2018. A comprehensive breakdown from the Division of Elections shows how this turnout compares to past election years.

Download the GoVoteTN app now!

Voters can download the GoVoteTN app, available in the App Store or Google Play, to view voter-specific information. Voters can find polling locations, view and mark sample ballots and much more. The platform is also available at GoVoteTN.com.

When polls open and close

Polls open at various times depending on the county. Here is a full list of when all 95 counties open. All polls in Tennessee close at 8 p.m. EDT / 7 p.m. CDT.

Being flexible may also help speed up the process. Midmorning and midafternoon are usually slower times at polling locations, while early morning, noon and 5 p.m. are peak times as people typically vote before work, after work or on their lunch breaks.

Voter ID

Tennesseans voting on Election Day should remember to bring valid photo identification with them to the polls. A driver’s license or photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security as well as photo IDs issued by Tennessee state government or the federal government are acceptable even if they are expired. College student IDs are not acceptable.

More information about what types of ID are acceptable can be found here: What ID is required when voting? or by calling toll free 1-877-850-4959.

Election results

Unofficial election results for the Aug. 2 primary will be posted at elections.tn.gov and these Twitter accounts:

What not to wear

State law requires polling locations and the area within a 100-foot boundary surrounding each entrance remain campaign-free zones. Tennessee law prohibits the display or distribution of campaign materials and the solicitation of votes for or against any person, party or question on the ballot in these areas.

Voters who have difficulty standing in line

Frail, physically disabled or visibly pregnant voters should tell their polling officials if they are unable to wait in line to vote. The law allows them to move through the process faster.

Questions?

People with questions or concerns about the voting process can go to GoVoteTN.com or call the Division of Elections toll-free at 1-877-850-4959.

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Library and Archives to Host its First Theatrical Performance “The Ryman Diaries”

History has inspired a number of popular interpretations. In August, the Tennessee State Library and Archives will host a unique event as part of its ongoing workshop series.

Award-winning actor/playwright/director Tom Dolan and author/musician/educator Debbie Mathis Watts portray Music City legends Captain Tom Ryman and Bettie Baugh Ryman in the multimedia musical stage play “The Ryman Diaries.”

The historical drama depicts the life and times of Cumberland riverboat captain Tom Ryman as told through the eyes of his wife Bettie Baugh Ryman. Based on historical research gathered at archival institutions, including the Library and Archives, the story highlights their unlikely romance, marriage, entrepreneurship, raising seven children on a riverboat, their Christian conversion at a tent meeting and the building of the Union Gospel Tabernacle.

“The Library and Archives is constantly finding new ways for Tennesseans to fully engage with our rich history. I encourage everyone to reserve their seat now for this special addition to our workshop series,” said Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett.

In play’s first act, the audience meets a young Tom Ryman, entrepreneur on the Cumberland River and Bettie Baugh, a debutante, growing up in Franklin. Both survived the Battle of Franklin when a cannonball comes through the window of the family home. Each tells of their adventures during the Civil War and how fate has love, romance and a history-making event planned for them.

The performance will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. CDT Saturday, Aug. 18, in the Library and Archives auditorium. The Library and Archives is located at 403 Seventh Ave. N., directly west of the Tennessee State Capitol in downtown Nashville. Free parking is available around the Library and Archives building.

Although the presentation is free and open to the public, registration is required due to seating limitations in the auditorium. To reserve seats, please visit rymandiaries.eventbrite.com.

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Claims Being Accepted in Settlement With SCC, LLC

The Secretary of State’s office, along with the Tennessee Attorney General’s office, is pleased to announce a settlement agreement with State Compliance Center, LLC – also known as SCC, LLC – as well as owners James Jacobs and John Jacobs.

Numerous complaints to the Division of Business Services prompted an investigation into SCC, LLC’s practices. The investigation revealed that between 2014 and 2016 the Jacobs sent allegedly misleading solicitations appearing to be from a government agency to businesses operating in Tennessee. Those solicitations made it seem like the business was required to obtain either a Certificate of Authorization or Certificate of Good Standing to legally do business in the state.

SCC, LLC charged businesses as much as $88 to obtain documents, which actually only cost $20 directly from the division. Certificates are not required to operate a business in Tennessee and are generally only necessary for other business purposes, such as obtaining a loan or entering into a contract.  The Attorney General’s office determined that the company and its owners’ actions violated the Tennessee Consumer Protection Act.

The Secretary of State’s office is now accepting claims from victims. Business owners who paid SCC, LLC for a certificate and would like to receive a portion of the settlement are required to produce documentation showing they paid SCC, LLC between 2014 and 2016.

All claims should be submitted to the Division of Business Services:

By mail: Division of Business Services
312 Rosa L. Parks Ave., 6th Floor
Nashville, TN 37243
By email: [email protected]

The division will accept and verify claims until Dec. 1, 2018.

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Tennessee Joins FTC, Other States to Combat Fraudulent Veterans Charities

The Tennessee Secretary of State’s office, along with the Tennessee Attorney General’s office, is joining the Federal Trade Commission and law enforcement officials and charity regulators from every state, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam and Puerto Rico in announcing “Operation Donate with Honor,” a sweeping new donor education campaign to help donors spot and avoid fundraising solicitations that falsely promise their donations will help veterans and service members.

Every year, grateful Americans repay the sacrifices made by those who serve in the U.S. armed forces with contributions to charities that promise to deliver needed help and services to veterans and service members. Most of these charities live up to fundraising promises, but a few attract donations by lying about help and support not actually delivered. In the process, they harm not only well-meaning donors but also the many legitimate charities engaged in important and vital work on behalf of veterans and service members.

“Tennesseans are some of the most giving people in the nation. It is unfortunate bad actors prey on our generosity for personal gain, especially when deceiving people into thinking they are helping the men and women who serve our country,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “I hope Tennesseans will continue to donate their hard-earned dollars to benefit veterans after doing research.”

Operation Donate with Honor was developed by the FTC and the National Association of State Charity Officials (NASCO), the association of state offices charged with oversight of charitable organizations and charitable solicitations in the United States. The initiative is intended to help consumers recognize charitable solicitation fraud and identify legitimate charities. A new video highlights tips on how to research charities on giving wisely to veterans’ organizations.

“Protecting Tennesseans from people or organizations that take advantage of the generosity of individuals who truly want to help those who have served our country with honor, is something my Office does not take lightly. We are proud to join with our state and federal partners to put an end to these deceptive acts,” said Tennessee Attorney General Herbert H. Slatery III.

Veterans fundraising fraud schemes target potential donors online, via telemarketing, direct mail, door-to-door contact and at retail stores, falsely promising to help homeless and disabled veterans, to provide veterans with employment counseling, mental health counseling or other assistance, and to send care packages to deployed service members. Many schemes solicit nationwide.

Before giving to a charity, check Tennessee’s Easy Steps to Wise Giving. Donors and business owners can also find information to help them donate wisely and make their donations count at FTC.gov/Charity.

Anyone with questions about a charity can contact the Division of Charitable Solicitations, Fantasy Sports and Gaming at 1-800-861-7393 or sos.tn.gov/charitable.

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Early Voting Begins Across Tennessee

Early voting for the Aug. 2 primary begins today.

Early voting runs Mondays through Saturdays and ends Saturday, July 28. Election Day is Thursday, Aug. 2. The voter registration deadline ahead of this primary was Tuesday, July 3.

“We expect major races to create lots of interest this election cycle as Tennesseans decide who will represent them across all levels of government. I urge voters to take advantage of early voting and use our free GoVoteTN app to know exactly when and where to vote,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett.

Voters can download the GoVoteTN app, available in the App Store or Google Play, to view voter-specific information. Voters can find early voting and Election Day polling locations, view and mark sample ballots and much more. The platform is also available at GoVoteTN.com.

“Polling locations and times can vary during early voting and on Election Day so it is important to verify information with your county election commission through our app,” Sec. Hargett said.

State law requires polling locations and the area within a 100-foot boundary surrounding each entrance remain campaign-free zones. Tennessee law prohibits the display or distribution of campaign materials and the solicitation of votes for or against any person, party or question on the ballot in these areas.

Tennesseans voting early or on Election Day should remember to bring valid photo identification with them to the polls. A driver’s license or photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security as well as photo IDs issued by Tennessee state government or the federal government are acceptable even if they are expired. College student IDs are not acceptable.

More information about what types of ID are acceptable can be found here: What ID is required when voting? or by calling toll free 1-877-850-4959.

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